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2012 In September, Mr. Olmert was given a one-year suspended jail sentence and a 75,300-shekel (about $20,000) fine for breaching the public’s trust in connection with his conduct as minister of trade and industry.

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Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife, Sara, at a ceremony in May, marking the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Israeli-Arab War.

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Abir Sultan/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Benjamin Netanyahu

1997 An Israeli reporter alleged that Mr. Netanyahu, during his first term as prime minister, had inappropriately interfered with the appointment of an attorney general in order to reach a political deal. The police recommended prosecuting him on charges of fraud and breach of trust, but the country’s attorney general, Elyakim Rubinstein, decided in April not to press charges, for lack of evidence.

2000 Mr. Netanyahu and his wife, Sara, were suspected of having charged the government for work done at their private residence. In March, the police said there was evidence of bribery, fraud and the theft of $100,000 worth of gifts to the state. The Jerusalem prosecutor, Moshe Lador, ordered the case closed, but it was later published that the state prosecutor at the time, Edna Arbel, had thought that the Netanyahus should be indicted with fraud.

2011 Mr. Netanyahu was accused by the state comptroller, Micha Lindenstrauss, of having the state and other entities pay his travel expenses and those of his wife and sons while in between terms as prime minister. (He left the postion after 1999 and resumed it a decade later after stints as the country’s finance minister and opposition leader.) Despite the comptroller’s findings, the attorney general at the time, Yehuda Weinstein, determined in 2014 there were no criminal suspicions. The matter was brought up again before the current state comptroller, Joseph Shapira, who had gathered additional evidence. Mr. Weinstein’s successor, Avichai Mandelblit, announced in 2017 that he was closing the case.

2018 After a yearlong graft inquiry, the police recommended late Tuesday that Mr. Netanyahu face prosecution on bribery, fraud and breach-of-trust charges. They said there was evidence he had accepted nearly $300,000 in gifts in exchange for official actions benefiting his patrons, and had back-room dealings with the publisher of a leading newspaper to ensure more favorable coverage.

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